More Beach to Love

May 16, 2019 Beach Nourishment Update

Nags Head's beach nourishment construction, taking place now in the south end of town, is moving steadily forward to Mile Post 21 thanks to good weather. Construction near Mile Post 11.5 is expected to start about May 25, 2019. As of today, the entire project is expected to be completed sometime in late July or early August. However, these plans may change. 

South Nags Head Construction Zone - Dredge Ellis Island
(From Forbes Street Near Mile Post 15.5 South to the Town Limits near Mile Post 21)

The Dredge Ellis Island is expected to finish nourishing the beach on the south end of her submerged line (this is the pipe through which sand is pumped from the offshore dredge onto the beach) near Limulus Street to Mile Post 21 in the next 2-3 days. Once that area has been completed, the pipe running south from the Limulus subline will be removed and installed to run north from that subline, so that operations can progress towards Outer Banks Pier and then towards Jennette's Pier. Construction in the area of Jennette's Pier.

North Nags Head Construction Zone  (Construction Not Yet Underway) - Dredge Liberty Island
(From Bonnett Street Near Mile Post 11 South to Forbes Street Near Mile Post 15.5) 

The second dredge on the project, the Liberty Island, is expected to begin work about May 25 from a submerged line just south of Curlew Street near Mile Post 11.5. Construction will progress north to Mile Post 11 (2919 South Virginia Dare Trail, which is the Bonnett Street public beach access) first, before moving south from the submerged line near Curlew Street and then further south towards Jennette's Pier. Once construction north to the Bonnett Street access is complete, the pipe will be removed and installed south of the subline at Curlew Street so that operations can progress south to meet up with the Dredge Ellis Island's construction site. 

NOTE -  Parking at the Juncos and Forrest Street beach accesses will be closed for the duration of the project, which is slated to last 90-120 days. However, pedestrian access will still be permitted. Lifeguard stands will still be in place, but may be moved a few feet to accommodate construction traffic. 

Subscribe to project updates from the Town of Nags Head on their website.

May 9, 2019 Beach Nourishment Update

Nags Head's beach nourishment project is progressing well with construction moving south towards the town line with the National Park Service at Mile Post 21. Once this area has been completed in 10 days or so, operations will turn north from near Pelican Street and begin progressing north towards Outer Banks Pier and then towards Jennette's Pier. 

The Dredge Liberty Island will begin working off of a second submerged line (through which sand is pumped from the dredge onto the beach) installed between Conch Street and Hollowell Street near Mile Post 11.5. Construction in this area is planned to begin around May 25, 2019 and will progress north to Mile Post 11 first, before moving south from the sub-line near Conch Street and then further south towards Jennette's Pier.

Subscribe to project updates from the Town of Nags Head on their website.

March 20, 2019 Beach Nourishment Update

The Town of Nags Head met with its beach nourishment dredging contractor, Great Lakes Dredge and Dock on March 14, 2019, for a pre-construction meeting. Great Lakes representatives said they plan to start mobilizing equipment in mid to late March and hope to begin construction in mid to late April. Two of the company's hopper dredges, the Ellis Island and Liberty Island, will work the project. 

The Ellis Island, the first dredge on site, will start working in the vicinity of Mile Post 20, and after progressing south to the end of the project area near Mile Post 21, the vessel will then move north. The Liberty Island will begin working in early to mid-May. At this time, Great Lakes expects the dredge to begin working in the north end of the project area, around Mile Post 11 and will proceed south to eventually meet with the Ellis Island.

Great Lakes representatives said that they expect construction to take 90-120 days, depending upon weather and continued equipment operation. Please keep in mind this is a very preliminary schedule and is likely to change.

Subscribe to project updates from the Town of Nags Head on their website.

What You Need to Know About Beach Nourishment

The Town of Nags Head is projected to begin their re-nourishment project in May 2019. The project is expected to last possibly into October 2019.

Please note that not every home in Nags Head and South Nags Head will be impacted. Those that are impacted will only be directly affected for a few days before the project work progresses to another area.

Approximately 4 million cubic yards of sand will be placed on 10 miles of beach from the Bonnett Street public access near Mile Post 11 south to the town line with the National Park Service near Mile Post 21. Dune stabilization measures such as sprigging and fencing will also be included in the project.

Beach nourishment is the process of pumping sand onto an eroding shoreline to widen the existing beach. Sources of sand may include a nearby sandbar, a dredged source such as an inlet or waterway, or an offshore borrow site along the ocean floor. The widened shoreline provides increased defense from coastal storms and beach erosion protecting property, communities and infrastructure located along the shoreline. Visitors staying in the affected areas may experience temporary construction noise, nighttime illumination, and beach access diversions. The process typically progresses throughout the project area relatively quickly.

Visitors are encouraged to stay tuned to MoreBeachtoLove.com for all details and updates on the project's progress and view maps of the project areas. There, you can sign up email updates and see areas which have already been completed, to help youplan your stay.

Those who love to visit and those who make the Outer Banks home know that beach nourishment is necessary to protect our infrastructure, our homes and businesses, and our beautiful beaches.

Additional options for things to do should the beach near you become inaccessible for a couple of days include:

  • Take a day trip and check out another area of the Outer Banks you maybe haven't visited before. This could be the perfect opportunity to check out our beaches in Duck or Corolla, Hatteras Island, or as close as Kill Devil Hills or Kitty Hawk for the day.
  • Visit H2OBX Waterpark! Sun Realty guests receive discounted tickets to the waterpark, which is just across the Wright Memorial Bridge in southern Currituck County. With two wave pools, an adventure lagoon, lazy river, and a number of family and one-two person thrill slides, adventure awaits at H2OBX.
  • Visit one of our natural or historic sites. The NC Aquarium on Roanoke Island is a great option for rainy day fun or as a break from the beach. Also on Roanoke Island, you'll find the Elizabthen Gardens, Lost Colony, and Roanoke Island Festival Park, home to the Elizabeth II, a ship representative of one of the seven English merchant vessels from the Roanoke Voyage of 1585.
  • Visit one of our sound accesses for crabbing, kiteboarding, kayaking, you name it!
  • Watch the re-nourishment in progress! There are three piers in the overall project area, which make great spots for watching the activity from a safe distance. Beach nourishment is vital to the health and sustanability of our beaches and our economy, and the whole process is very impressive to watch. K
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